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"Treme" Season 4 on HBO is a drama series from the producers of "The Wire" that follows musicians, chefs, Mardi Gras Indians and ordinary New Orleanians as they try to rebuild their lives, their homes and their unique culture in the aftermath of the 2005 hurricane and levee failure that caused the near-death of an American city.

"Treme" begins in fall 2005, three months after Hurricane Katrina and the massive engineering failure in which flood control failed throughout New Orleans, flooding 80 percent of the city and displacing hundreds of thousands of residents. Fictional events depicted in the series will honor the actual chronology of political, economic and cultural events following the storm.

The drama unfolds with Antoine Batiste, a smooth-talking trombonist who is struggling to make ends meet, earning cash with any gig he can get, including playing in funeral processions for his former neighbors. His ex-wife, LaDonna Batiste-Williams, owns a bar in the Central City neighborhood and splits her time between New Orleans and Baton Rouge, where her children and new husband have relocated. Concerned over the disappearance of her younger brother David, or Daymo, unseen since the storm, LaDonna has turned to a local civil rights attorney, the overburdened and underpaid Toni Bernette, for help. The government's inconsistent and ineffectual response to the devastation has spurred Bernette's husband Creighton, a university professor of English literature and an expert on local history, to become an increasingly outspoken critic of the institutional response.

Trem resident Davis McAlary, a rebellious radio disc jockey, itinerant musician and general gadfly, is both chronicler of and participant in the city's vibrant and varied musical culture, which simply refuses to be silent, even in the early months after the storm. His occasional partner, popular chef Janette Desautel, hopes to regain momentum for her small, newly re-opened neighborhood restaurant. Elsewhere in the city, displaced Mardi Gras Indian chief Albert Lambreaux returns to find his home destroyed and his tribe, the Guardians of the Flame, scattered, but Lambreaux is determined to rebuild. His son Delmond, an exile in New York playing modern jazz and looking beyond New Orleans for his future, is less sure of his native city's future, while violinist Annie and her boyfriend Sonny, young street musicians living hand-to-mouth, seem wholly committed to the battered city.

As the story begins, more than half the population of New Orleans is elsewhere and much of the city is wrecked, muddied and caked in mold, while other neighborhoods remain viable. The tourists have yet to return, the money that follows them is scarce, and residents can take solace only in the fact that the city's high levels of crime have migrated to Houston and Baton Rouge. And for those returning, housing is hard to come by, with many people waiting on insurance checks that may never arrive.

The ensemble cast of "Treme" includes Wendell Pierce ("The Wire," "When the Levees Broke") as Antoine Batiste; Khandi Alexander ("CSI: Miami," "The Corner") as LaDonna Batiste-Williams; Clarke Peters ("Damages," "The Wire" and "The Corner") as Albert Lambreaux; Rob Brown ("Stop-Loss," "Finding Forrester") as Delmond Lambreaux; Steve Zahn ("A Perfect Getaway," "Sunshine Cleaning") as Davis McAlary; Kim Dickens ("Deadwood") as Janette Desautel; Melissa Leo ("Homicide: Life on the Street"; Oscar nominee for "Frozen River") as Toni Bernette; John Goodman ("The Big Lebowski," "O Brother, Where Art Thou?") as Creighton Bernette; Michiel Huisman ("The Young Victoria") as Sonny; and classical violinist Lucia Micarelli as Annie.

The series will also feature cameos by notable real-life New Orleanians, as well as the talents of many of its extraordinary musicians and other artists associated with the city's music. Early episodes feature appearances by Allen Toussaint, Dr. John, Elvis Costello, Steve Earle, Kermit Ruffins, Donald Harrison Jr., Galactic, Trombone Shorty Andrews, Deacon John, and the Rebirth and Trem Brass Bands.

"Treme" is named for the Faubourg Trem (an historic neighborhood just to the lakeside of the more celebrated French Quarter). Jazz itself was said to be born there, created by the slaves of Creole planters who were allowed to drum and chant on Sundays and market days in a public area that came to be known as Congo Square. It was in New Orleans that African rhythms and the pentatonic scale of flatted "blue" notes met European instrumentation and arrangements a cross-cultural creation that transformed music on a worldwide scale.

The 80-minute pilot episode of "Treme" was directed by Agnieszka Holland ("The Wire," "Cold Case"). Additional episodes are directed by Simon Cellan Jones ("Generation Kill") as well as alumni of "The Wire," including Jim McKay (HBO's "In Treatment" and "Big Love"), Ernest Dickerson ("Burn Notice"), Anthony Hemingway (the upcoming film "Redtails"), Christine Moore ("CSI: NY"), Brad Anderson ("Fringe," "The Machinist") and Dan Attias ("Big Love," "House").

In addition to Simon and Overmyer, "Treme" is written by David Mills ("The Corner" and "The Wire") and George Pelecanos ("The Wire" and "The Pacific"). Additional writers include New Orleans natives Lolis Elie (author and columnist for The New Orleans Times-Picayune) and Tom Piazza (author of the novel "City of Refuge" and "Why New Orleans Matters").

Season 4

Beginning in November 2008 and culminating at Mardi Gras 2009, the new season revisits the musicians, chefs, Mardi Gras Indians and other familiar New Orleanians who continue to rebuild their lives, their homes and their culture in the aftermath of the 2005 hurricane that caused the near-death of an American city.

Heightened by a historic presidential election, the promise of economic and cultural recovery in New Orleans is tempered by sobering economics, continued police corruption and the ongoing specter of violence and crime. More than three years after the flooding that followed Hurricane Katrina, nothing in the civic firmament seems to work as it should. New Orleanians are subject to corrupt and brutal law enforcement, a fragile school system and economic priorities that almost willfully exclude the people who need help.

But one thing works: The culture.

In this improbable city, which is responsible for some of America's greatest cultural gifts, the protagonists of "Treme" can rely on little, other than a sense of what they can, and must, create that gives life in New Orleans power and value. Here, the multiculturalism that has created and sustained the Crescent City — a blend that is French and Caribbean, Spanish and African-American and American — is a value embraced and understood by those who can't imagine living anywhere else. By such currency, New Orleans keeps its people committed to it, despite the odds.

This season, as one major character bravely faces his mortality, others look to make headway in careers, relationships and artistic endeavors, all amidst hope that an Obama administration will bring renewed attention and financial aid to New Orleans. The results are mixed, as opportunities end up in the hands of outsiders looking for quick financial gain, while the guardians of the flame struggle to make their voices heard over the din of construction and local politics.

As ever, "Treme" will feature live performances of New Orleans music in its natural environment, the clubs and streets and homes of the city. Musicians featured in season four include John Boutté, Kermit Ruffins, Michael Doucet, Davis Rogan, Don B, Guitar Lightnin' Lee, Ellis Marsalis, Troy "Trombone Shorty" Andrews, Terence Blanchard, Aurora Nealand, Corey Glover, Ed Gerrard, Christie Jourdain, Jon Cleary, Donald Harrison, Jr., Kidd Jordan, Dr. John, Jon Batiste, Charmaine Neville and Tom McDermott.

Culinary guest actors this season include David Chang and Emeril Lagasse.

"Treme" was created by David Simon and Eric Overmyer; executive producers, David Simon, Nina K. Noble, Eric Overmyer, Carolyn Strauss; co-executive producer, David Mills; producer, Anthony Hemingway; directors, Agnieszka Holland, Jim McKay, Ernest Dickerson, Anthony Hemingway, Christine Moore, Brad Anderson, Simon Cellan Jones, Dan Attias; writers, David Simon, Eric Overmyer, David Mills, George Pelecanos, Lolis Elie, Tom Piazza.


Network: HBO
Genre: Drama
Runtime: 60 mins.
Premiere Date: April, 2010
Finale Date: December 29, 2013
Seasons: 4
Theme Song:
"Treme Song" performed by John Boutte
Production Company: Blown Deadline Productions

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dakota says:
I seen it once, never could find it again!! Is it still on, if so what night and on what HBO channel? Thanks so much for anwering this for me. I love John Goodman and Nawlins.
larry says:
will be TREME be on this FALL?
rita says:
I love Treme so please keep it going.

Got Treme spoilers? What did you think of the last show?

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